Therapy before Punishment by Valerie Brown Cheers

“This is what prison systems do under emergency circumstances–they move to punitive social control mechanisms,” explains Haney. “[But] it’s a very short-term solution, and one that may do more long-term damage both to the system and to the individuals than it solves.”

Do we do bad so that we can do good? Is it on purpose which we go down the wrong path? Is it a purpose for making mistakes? Is it a purpose for us to turn those mistakes into positives and testimonies? Do we go through trials and tribulations to make us stronger? Do you think if we promote therapy before punishment that we may cut down on the recidivism rate? Do you think that inmate therapy could help with mental health issues?   Can pets used as a form of therapy to which could also help with mental illness issues?

According to Joe Stasio, Copy of The Role of Social Marketing with Recidivism – “Social marketing, as a discipline, was born in the 1970’s. It recognized that marketing principles could be used to influence consumer thinking about public issues in a similar way as how they are used to sell products. Kotler and Andreasen define social marketing as “Differing from other areas of marketing only with respect to the objectives of the marketer and his or her organization. Social marketing seeks to influence social behaviors not to benefit the marketer, but to benefit the target audience and the general society.

Other definitions include, Social Marketing is the planning and implementation of programs designed to bring about social change using concepts from commercial marketing”.

This blog will embark on ways to cut down on recidivism of the incareration rate through education and the access of writing materials, access to publish books, databases to be used for research, etc.  You could say that they will and be able to complete their education and from my knowledge, education makes you want to change your path and more willing to contribute to society, rather than being a problem of.

It will also show where we lie statistic wise, when it comes to the incarceration rate in this country; and will also show where our biggest problem lies within the sentencing of drug offenses which tends to be our biggest dilemma which could be cut increasingly by legalizing “Cannabis.” If something is legal which would be medicinal marijuana, this situation could help decrease crime increasingly!  Yes, you may say, “Is she nutz? No, but am tired of seeing our prisons being full for us the taxpayers to pay their way. If we are taxpayers, we should be able to find ways to help with our tax dollars and find ways of implementing positive means of them being utilized for our communities.

This will and could encourage those who once led the life of continually being incarcerated, on the path to not returning to prison. As part of their punishment could also be obligations to speak to our youth about their experiences, or a “scared straight tactic” to our youth which could be repayment to society and to their community and lastly, could show our youth why being incarcerated is not the path to take nor want to even begin as part of life.

Therapy should be used be given first to prisoners and inmates, and also continuing education should be a considertion which is required which will also change minds, and make them think twice about returining.  Punishment would be for inmates to have to speak to our youth about why incarceration does not make you a man, woman nor a way of life. Also, how important it is being a leader and being an adult with responsibilities which we all have others who look up to us, and incarceration is not the way to do this.   They could do practice speaking to kids as part of their punishment, who are given tours of the prison system while they are in prison, which will prepare the prisioners for when they get on the outside world to begin to speak as part of their punishment to communities and to our youths in our schools!

According to the The Price of Prisons | Missouri fact sheet 2012, the average annual cost per inmate is $22,350, with a total state cost of prisons being $680.5 million.  This is what incarceration costs taxpayers of the state of Missouri which is my hometown, born and raised.

Writer Brian Walsh is being honored as a Connected Educator Champion of Change. In his article he wrote that “Correctional education is one of the most effective tools to lower the recidivism rate.”  The article found that “A recent meta-analysis by RAND found that offenders who participated in education programs while incarcerated were 43% less likely to return to prison and 13% more likely to become employed.  The Washington State Institute for Public Policy has found that adult basic education, post-secondary education, and vocational education programs, have a net return to taxpayers and society of at least $13 per $1 spent.  Prison education programs help offenders prepare for reentry and are effective tools in reducing future crime.”

Mr. Walsh quoted, “I like to tell people that we have some of the best students imaginable.  They do all their homework, even the questions that aren’t assigned.  They don’t interrupt class with their cell phone. They come to class wanting to be there and knowing that it is the best opportunity they have in prison for a quiet, meaningful way to serve their sentence.  But our students have committed some of the worst crimes imaginable.  And unlike the teacher who looks forward to visits from their former students, we do not.  Our hope is that by changing how technology is used in prison classrooms, our students will never come back.”

After doing much research I have also found that when the legalization of “Cannabis” becomes official in the state of Missouri, this will also cut down on the incarceration rate also, while most inmates which are incarcerated right now as it stands have or are being sentenced as drug offenses.

People Sentenced For Drug Offenses In the U.S. Correctional System

Here are 5 of  31 basic data overviews when it comes to the number of people serving time for drug offenses in U.S. Prisons.

  • (Number Of People Serving Time For Drug Offenses In US Prisons)

    Federal: “Between 2001 and 2013, more than half of prisoners serving sentences of more than a year in federal facilities were convicted of drug offenses (table 15 and table 16). On September 30, 2013 (the end of the most recent fiscal year for which federal offense data were available), 98,200 inmates (51% of the federal prison population) were imprisoned for possession, trafficking, or other drug crimes.”

    State: “Drug offenders comprised 16% (210,200 inmates) of the total state prison population in 2012. Twenty-five percent of female prisoners were serving time for drug offenses, compared to 15% of male prisoners. Similar proportions of white, black, and Hispanic offenders were convicted of drug and public-order crimes.”

    Source:

    Carson, E. Ann. Prisoners In 2013. Washington, DC: US Dept of Justice Bureau of Justice Statistics, Sept. 2014, NCJ247282. Federal data: p. 16; state data: p. 15.
    http://www.bjs.gov/index.cfm?ty=pbdetail&iid=5109
    http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/p13.pdf

    (People On Probation For Drug Offenses In The US, 2013)
    Of the 3,910,647 adults on probation in the US at the end of 2013, 25% (approximately 977,662 people) had a drug charge as their most serious offense.
    Source:

    Erinn J. Herberman, PhD, and Thomas P. Bonczar, “Probation and Parole in the United States, 2013” (Washington, DC: US Dept. of Justice Bureau of Justice Statistics, October 2014), NCJ248029, Appendix Table 2, p. 16, and Appendix Table 3, p. 17.
    http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/ppus13.pdf

    (People On Parole For Drug Offenses In The US, 2013) Of the 853,215 people on parole at the end of 2013, 32% (approximately 273,029 people) had a drug charge as their most serious offense.
  • Source:

    Erinn J. Herberman, PhD, and Thomas P. Bonczar, “Probation and Parole in the United States, 2013” (Washington, DC: US Dept. of Justice Bureau of Justice Statistics, October 2014), NCJ248029, Appendix Table 4, p. 18, and Appendix Table 6, p. 20.
    http://www.bjs.gov/content/pub/pdf/ppus13.pdf

    (Drug Use By Adults On Parole In The US, 2013)
    “• In 2013, an estimated 1.7 million adults aged 18 or older were on parole or other supervised release from prison at some time during the past year. About one quarter (27.4 percent) were current illicit drug users, with 20.4 percent reporting current use of marijuana and 12.1 percent reporting current nonmedical use of psychotherapeutic drugs. These rates were higher than those reported by adults aged 18 or older who were not on parole or other supervised release during the past year (9.3 percent for current illicit drug use, 7.5 percent for current marijuana use, and 2.4 percent for current nonmedical use of psychotherapeutic drugs).”

    Source:

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Results from the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Summary of National Findings, NSDUH Series H-48, HHS Publication No. (SMA) 14-4863. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2014, p. 29.
    http://www.samhsa.gov/data/NSDUH/2013SummNatFindDetTables/Index.aspx
    http://www.samhsa.gov/data/NSDUH/2013SummNatFindDetTables/NationalFindin…

  • (Drug Use by Adults on Probation in the US, 2013)
    “In 2013, an estimated 4.5 million adults aged 18 or older were on probation at some time during the past year. More than one quarter (31.4 percent) were current illicit drug users, with 23.5 percent reporting current use of marijuana and 12.3 percent reporting current nonmedical use of psychotherapeutic drugs. These rates were higher than those reported by adults who were not on probation during the past year (9.0 percent for current illicit drug use, 7.3 percent for current marijuana use, and 2.3 percent for current nonmedical use of psychotherapeutic drugs).”

    Source:

    Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, Results from the 2013 National Survey on Drug Use and Health: Summary of National Findings, NSDUH Series H-48, HHS Publication No. (SMA) 14-4863. Rockville, MD: Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration, 2014, p. 30.
    http://www.samhsa.gov/data/NSDUH/2013SummNatFindDetTables/Index.aspx
    http://www.samhsa.gov/data/NSDUH/2013SummNatFindDetTables/NationalFindin…

    Sentencing and Prison Practices in Germany and the Netherlands: Implications for the United States
    Germany and the Netherlands have significantly lower incarceration rates than the United States and make much greater use of non-custodial penalties, particularly for nonviolent crimes. In addition, conditions and practices within correctional facilities in these countries—grounded in the principle of “normalization” whereby life in prison is to resemble as much as possible life in the community—also differ markedly from the U.S. In February 2013—as part of the European-American Prison Project funded by the California-based Prison Law Office and managed by Vera—delegations of corrections and justice system leaders from Colorado, Georgia, and Pennsylvania together visited Germany and the Netherlands to tour prison facilities, speak with corrections officials and researchers, and interact with inmates. Although variations in the definitions of crimes, specific punishments, and recidivism limit the availability of comparable justice statistics, this report describes the considerably different approaches to sentencing and corrections these leaders observed in Europe and the impact this exposure has had (and continues to have) on the policy debate and practices in their home states. It also explores some of the project’s practical implications for reform efforts throughout the United States to reduce incarceration and improve conditions of confinement while maintaining public safety.

    More than 10.2 million prisoners in the world, new report shows  http://www.prisonstudies.org/

    More than 10.2 million people are held in penal institutions throughout the world according to the latest edition of the World Prison Population List (WPPL), researched and compiled by Roy Walmsley and published on Friday 22 November 2013 by the International Centre for Prison Studies. If those reported to be held in ‘detention centres’ in China and prison camps in North Korea were included the total would be more than 11 million.

    The International Centre for Prison Studies was founded in 1997 for the purposes of conducting research on prisons and imprisonment; developing and disseminating knowledge about how imprisonment should be used; and contributing to improved policy and practice in prisons across the world. 

    The work of the Centre includes the production of the prisons handbook, A Human Rights Approach to Prison Management, and the development of the World Prison Brief database. The Centre also carries out work on a project or consultancy basis for international agencies, governmental and non-governmental organisations.

    In November 2014, the Centre merged with the Institute for Criminal Policy Research at Birkbeck, University of London. The Institute for Criminal Policy Research provides a home within which the Centre’s work on the World Prison Brief and other research and project-based activities will continue to grow and develop.

     There are ways which can help with the incarceration rate beginning with supplying inmates with educational program which will not only keep them from returning but allowing them to give back to the community and to our youth. This is and would be the beginning where they could be allowed to write about they have done, what and why they won’t be returning to prison or jail, speak to our youth both while they are in there and when they come back could be a way of them giving back to the community and for the judicial prison system to give back to the community also by implementing ways of cutting the recidivism rate rather than building more prisions for future prisoners.
    We must begin to discourage and not encourage our youth from becoming prisoners of the penal system! But, we as a society in the United States must also have what is necessary for them to be able to be given a second chance while also showing how important it is to lower the recidivism rate in our country.
    Like most social problems, it is complex and has advocates, on many sides of the issues, advancing solutions that are being recognized, at best, as incomplete. Can social marketing be the impetus that connects all these disparate solutions into one cohesive whole?  Can it influence people enough to change behavior?
    Education can be a useful tool for rehabilitating inmates, and I know that if the prison systems were supplied with sufficient resources rather than big screen television sets, etc. and other unnecessary things which we the taxpayers are paying for. These are prisons and we should make them where they don’t want to come back and not live their and keep coming back for life!
    In conclusion, we feel that therapy should be given to the inmates  and then punishment. How can you possibly think that you can fix something without getting to the root of the problem first? Mental health has got to be addressed in this country and starting with the inmates who are incarcerated to decrease recidivism would be a great place to start in this country of the United States which is number three (3) when it comes to having the most incarcerated prisoners in the world.

http://www.prisonstudies.org/resources/sentencing-and-prison-practices-germany-and-netherlands-implications-united-states

– See more at: http://www.drugwarfacts.org/cms/prisons_and_drugs#sthash.sdDeydXf.dpuf

http://www.drugwarfacts.org/cms/prisons_and_drugs#sthash.sdDeydXf.dpbshttp://www.vera.org/files/price-of-prisons-missouri-fact-sheet.pdf

https://www.whitehouse.gov/blog/2013/11/26/using-technology-reduce-recidivism-prisoners

http://www.merriam-webster.com/dictionary/damnant%20quod%20non%20intelligunt

https://www.academia.edu/7022064/Copy_of_The_Role_of_Social_Marketing_with_Recidivism

http://www.apa.org/monitor/julaug03/rehab.aspx

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